Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Au Revoir

Sad fact of life: many of the teachers who work at Quisqueya are here on a "few years" basis. I try to ignore this fact and operate as if we will all be here together forever, especially since I feel so particularly bonded to my fellow teachers with whom I've experienced a) my first year of teaching, b) my first year of living in Haiti, and c) the largest natural disaster in the Western hemisphere in at least a century. Oh yeah, that.


Alas.

This month almost all the Quisqueya teachers have declared their intentions to return next year or not, and I am so sad to imagine life here without some of our close friends. Almost ten of my pals are heading elsewhere, for a whole host of reasons: some are staying in Haiti but pursuing other ministries, some are returning to the US to tend to romantic relationships or family members in need, and still others will begin graduate school. Some just don't feel this is the place for them, or they've been here for quite some time and are due for a furlough.

In any case, it makes me sad. I truly cherish my little posse here. We are very comingled- my coworkers are my friends, and my friends are my church, and my bosses are also my friends, and my students and their parents fit in some or all of those aforementioned categories as well.

I will not try to talk anyone out of leaving.... much.

I will, however, try to squeeze every moment out of this remaining semester with us all here together. More card games. More grading-papers-together-with-a-movie-on nights. More dress up, more hot tea, more popcorn made on the stove, more Scum, more Hendrick living room, more Eagle-Giant-Big Star runs (our grocery stores). More Thursday worship nights with Mary's chili. That's what I wish.

I will remember that just because we won't work together daily doesn't mean friends are over, and that I'll still FacebookSkypeGchatEmailTwitterBlog-stalk them regularly. I'll remember that some amazing people are remaining, people I enjoy immensely and respect entirely. And I also will remember that I didn't know any of these people 13 months ago, and therefore its equally possible that the new people who come to replace them will become dear friends as well. Oh please, God, oh please oh please oh please make it so.

Speaking of new people. Would you like to be one? Join our campus crew, love on some students in Haiti, pour the contents of your brain into young minds (however reluctantly they might receive it at times!)?
Quisqueya will be hiring. Email us if you're interested, and we'll forward it to the right person.

Also, would you help by forwarding this need for excellent teachers in Haiti to others around you? Think seminaries, education departments, schools, churches...

Thank you  in advance :)

Bad at change,
Katie

1 comment:

  1. Katie, I can relate. We lived in a very transient city when we lived in France and people tended to stay to themselves so they wouldn't get attached to anyone. Thank goodness not everyone was like this or we wouldn't had made any friends. I will be eternally thankful to those who opened their homes, lives and hearts to us! You can make a difference too!
    Becca

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