Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Reading list

It has been a very busy week at school for me. Not as much time to blog as I would have hoped, but I wanted to provide everyone with some things to think about. Below are a collection of articles related to Haiti. I do not endorse all of the ideas they put forth but I think they are useful for expanding our ideas on what rebuilding this country will really take.

Please read and feel free to let us know what you think. (A big thank you to my bosses wife, Ruth, who has been very dilligent in sharing articles that she had read)

This article discusses the death toll and gives some insight into the way the Haitian government works.

I never thought I would link to Huffington Post (my Fox News-watching-father is probably choking on his dinner right now) but they do discuss the lack of food production here in Haiti. Also, Mr. Jean-Baptist is a QCS parent.

This is my favorite article. And the only one I will editorialize about. It is vital that money be spent locally.

On roughly the same topic, this article outlines the battle between the large NGO's and the smaller aid organizations.

The Comfort, should it stay or should it go?

Those are just some of the things we are reading in Haiti.

Blessings and Peace
Ben

6 comments:

  1. Wow! Just reading the first article amazes me. Here I thought the changing 'body count' was due to finding more people as buildings were searched. It seems it has mainly to do with not tracking how many people were being buried. For an average American who watched as the Twin Towers debris was sifted through by anthropologists, this just seems surreal.

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  2. I was watching a recent international business program and an international economist was asked why there are such wide discrepancies between countrys' living standards. I was expecting education levels, or government types, or something. He said it is the level of corruption. Folks are not willing to take the chance of starting a business or outside investment will not occur if the entrepreneur or investor is not sure his/her business will not be taken away. I'm sure there are lots of factors, but google 'corruption index' and see the high correlation independent rating agencies give to corruption vs per capita income, etc. ps: whatever the reasons, I'm thankful for godly people like you doing God's work, wherever that might be.

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  3. The article about buying locally was an interesting idea I hadn't really thought about. Tough tightrope to walk during the first few weeks of a disaster, but now hopefully at least some of the needs can be met by Haitian businesses.

    The Comfort article was confusing. Is the medical situation so well in hand there that a floating Mayo Clinic can be let go??? Hard to believe. OK, I'm done.

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  4. Thanks for the reading list. All very worthy, although going over to the Huffington Post was painful.

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  5. Tony, I think the comfort article paints a good picture of the lack of communication and discrepency between what big NGO's and Governments think and what people working on the ground think.

    I agree with the Dr. who said that there will be people who need complicated surgeries in the months to come. I would be okay with The Comfort leaving if there was a plan for how to deal with advanced and complicated cases. To me it seems like there isn't. Of course, I am also not a medical professional, just a teacher.

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  6. I have to admit I prefer almost anything over Fox News. ;-) Thank you for sharing all these articles; I read them all.

    It's all such a mess, and sadly, Haiti already seems to be disappearing from the news here. :-(

    Thank you for staying. Everyone would have understood if you had left, but thank you for staying. Sending money can seem empty, but I know that is what's needed most. Reading your blog makes me feel like I'm there in a way. I guess it's like a chain of love: we send money and you use it the best you can to help the people.

    I just hope it's not a band-aid and that the Haitian people can somehow become self-sustaining. How to achieve that, I don't know. I guess that's the million dollar question.

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